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Fruition Garden Journal

video tutorials, tried-and-true tips + our latest learnings to surround you with abundance all season long

How to Grow Microgreens at Home

Nov 22, 2019
 

Microgreens save us each winter, making it easy to get through the darkest months with luscious greens. Often harvested ten days after they're sown, microgreens may be the closest thing to instant gratification in our gardens.

And hey!

I'd love to share my free 

How to Grow Microgreens at Home 

webinar with you!

I'm soon sharing my knowledge and passion in a free half-hour webinar; even if you can't join us live I'll share the instant replay with you when you register. Learn more here and see you soon!

We've learned a lot about how to grow microgreens indoors across the years and I'm delighted to share the keys with you :)

What Seeds to Sow for Microgreens

Oh, the possibilities!

Anything delicious that sprouts quick is a great choice for microgreens. More colors = more nutrients, so lean into rainbow chard, purple basil and everything in between :)

Here are our favorites:

broccoli

kale

arugula

mesclun mix (our spicy mix is our favorite...

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How to Harvest & Save Sunflower Seeds: It's Deceptively Easy

Sep 29, 2019
 

To Save Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds would be one of the easiest seeds to save, except that they're so enticingly delectable to so many other animals, humans included.
 
Nonetheless, we've saved many millions of them, so you can, too :)  

One of the most challenging aspects of saving sunflower seed is this: You must not harvest the most spectacular heads for bouquets! Expect seed about 6 weeks after flower. This is our Lemon Queen, by the way :)

To Harvest Sunflower Seeds

First, wait for the birds to confirm the seed is fully ripe.

Though many flower seeds are released with ease once ripe, sunflowers tend to hold them in their heads, making it more challenging to know exactly when they're ripe. Many flower heads also indicate their seeds are ripe once the stalk beneath is brown and dry, though with sunflowers, that is generally way too late and you'll rarely find a single seed left.

So yes --- this is playing with fire --- but if you...

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Timing Is Everything: Fruition's Seed Starting Calendar

Mar 14, 2019

In our gardens and in our lives, timing is everything.

And Friends, it is so easy to start seeds way too early. 

My dear friend Sal and I created a planting calendar for you to help nail your timing this season!

It's counter-intuitive, but plants started too early often get stressed (too little light, too few nutrients) and thus produce later and less abundantly than younger plants that are less stressed.

So hold your horses, dear Friends!

And here is our calendar for Zones 4 through 6 to keep you on track:

Each online order this season will receive one of our planting calendars, as well :)

You'll find a ton of information on this chart and each of our packets are mini-encyclopedias of information, as well. In addition to longer growing instructions, there is a quick reference tab with some pretty handy advice to have at arm's length. You'll find plant spacing after thinning, whether to direct sow or transplant (or both), days to germination, when to sow and seeding...

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Sunflowers (& Why I Have Hope for the World)

Dec 14, 2018
 

Friends, I need more than hands and toes to count the number of times people this week have told me their child asked to give or receive sunflower seeds this holiday season. 

How can I not have hope for the world?!

What gift would you give the world, if you could give anything?

The gift of a sunflower is the gift of growth, of beauty, of abundance, it's the gift of life itself.

There are dozens of different sunflowers, all native to Central and North America. The only plant with more Monarchs on it in our garden is milkweed. 

And did you know?

Sunflower petals are EDIBLE!

We toss them in salads and arrange them on cakes all summer long.

So yes, we grow the seeds of many sunflowers, each one with a unique gift and story to share. 

Lemon Queen

We love the bright lemon yellow of Lemon Queen petals, a unique hue among so many golds. She is ohhhhh so tall, easily climbing 12+ feet tall in rich, fertile soil. She is crowned with a massive, single head on top and bursts...

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6 Easy Seeds to Direct Sow in June (& How to Transplant, If You Must)

May 31, 2018
 

Once final frost has come and gone and the nights are consistently above 50 F, the soil is finally warm enough for the crops that thrive in the heat of summer. 

Some of them, like tomatoes and ground cherries, absolutely must be started 6 to 8 weeks prior to final frost to have any chance of surrounding you with abundance in short seasons.

Others, like basil and cosmos, will surround you with abundance whether you transplant or direct sow them.

Here, friends, are the crops whose fragile, sensitive root systems despise being transplanted. When direct-sown, they'll grow faster and fruit earlier, increasing your harvests significantly. (If you must transplant them, be sure to follow the tips on peat/cow pots and soil blocks at the bottom of the list.)

 

1. Cucurbits

A brush up on botanical Latin! The Cucurbit family classically sprawls and is slightly spiny, including everything from summer squash to winter squash, cantaloupe to cucumber. 

As you're...

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10 Easy Seeds to Sow in May

May 04, 2018
 

10 Easy Seeds to Sow in May

Daffodils bloom, wood frogs sing! As robins pull worms from the warming soil, here are ten easy seeds to sow in May.

1. Peas

The classic harbinger of spring, peas are sown as soon as your soil can be worked. (What does that mean? Check out this video.) Some years we sow peas in March. Other years, it's May. All seasons have their advantages and disadvantages. Everything's grand or everything's not grand: you choose. I digress.

Peas tolerate cool seasons better than most plants in your garden. To some extent, the earlier you plant your peas the earlier you'll harvest peas. Keep in mind: peas developing in cooler temperatures will be sweeter and more tender than those developing in the heat of summer. So tuck them in quick! And whatever you do, please resist starting them indoors; peas absolutely despise having their sensitive root systems uprooted. Most of us can relate.

To extend your pea harvest this season, sow both dwarf and full-size...

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