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Fruition Garden Journal

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Successful Succession Sowing in July

Jul 06, 2018
 

Our gardens are a lush jungle in the hot, hot sun as baby birds learn to fly across the fields and our dogs find respite under zucchini leaf umbrellas. 

As we harvest heads of lettuce, rows of beets, pull out peas and feed bolting cilantro to the chickens, we're sowing seeds so the abundance doesn't stop. Our season is short, so we've got to make the most of it! Succession sowing is the genius, seamless transition of one crop to the next, amplifying your abundance all season long.

In July, following our harvest of peas, carrots, beets, garlic and lettuce, here is what we are succession sowing, between dips in the pond:

1. Greens

You have so many options!

The good news: Greens don't require tons of fertility, so don't hesitate to plant lettuce where you just harvested lettuce.

The bad news: not all greens thrive in the heat, so be sure you're planting those that will. Nonetheless, options abound:

And here are our go-to July varieties, including our most...
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Harbinger of Harbingers: Sowing Allium Seeds for Spring

Feb 20, 2018
 

Harbinger of Harbingers: Sowing Allium Seeds for Spring

With snow still on the ground and freezing nights long from over, it's finally time to sow the first seeds of spring. 

But don't worry, it's not time to start everything. In fact, most seeds sown this early would be sown months too soon. 

The only seeds to sow in February are allium seeds.  The Allium family (thanks for the great name, Linneus) include onions, leeks, shallotschives and garlic. Garlic is planted in fall and chives can wait 'til April, but the first three are best sown mid-February to mid-March. It's not a race and no need to make any extra work for yourself, just know if you're looking forward to homegrown shallots as much as I am, it's time to start planning. 

Materials You'll Need:

Here is a materials list to get you started from page 15 of Rise & Shine: Starting Seeds with Ease, Fruition's eBook making it easy for you to sow seeds like a pro:

Organic Seed...

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5 Keys to Preventing Tomato Disease (there is no silver bullet, but #1 is close)

Jan 26, 2018

5 Keys to Preventing Tomato Disease

(there is no silver bullet, but #1 is close)

Whether you hope to harvest 10 or 10,000 tomatoes, diseases like Late Blight, Early Blight and Septoria Leaf Spot are affecting your abundance every season here in the Northeast.

Here are the 5 keys to preventing tomato disease:

1. Start with disease-resistant seeds.

Sowing seeds with natural genetic resistance to these diseases is the single greatest thing you can do to increase your success whether you are an organic or conventional grower.

Often flavorful heirlooms have little disease resistance and modern varieties with tons of disease resistance have little remarkable flavor. There are exceptions though, and here are some:

Chiapas

 

A delicious heirloom tomato that shares the classic tomato genus but belongs to a separate species, so it has some natural resistance to many diseases.

Brandywise

A brand new hybrid slicing tomato with impressive resistance to Late Blight, Septoria Leaf Spot...

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