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Fruition Garden Journal

video tutorials, tried-and-true tips + our latest learnings to surround you with abundance all season long

5 Easy Strategies to Thwart Your Gray Squash Bugs

Aug 22, 2019
 

Many people will proclaim, "Stink Bug!" when they see Gray Squash Bugs ambling about on their zucchini. Indeed, they are 'true' bugs and the stink is real when they're crushed. Gray Squash Bugs are close relatives of the resident 'stink bugs' in your home.

A little knowledge goes a long way, so here is the biology you need to know plus the organic management keys to keep in mind.

It's a Bug's Life(cycle)

First, Gray Squash bug eggs are gorgeously shiny metallic bronze in clusters of about twenty eggs laid underneath squash leaves, often tucked along a vein. Cucumber beetle eggs are astonishingly similar, though there is more space between eggs (see below). Either way, if you see them, squish them!

An adult squash bug laying her eggs. Photo credit to insectimages.org.

Gray Squash beetle eggs are laid a dense cluster (right) compared to Cucumber beetle eggs (left) which have more space between eggs. Both are most often on the underside of cucurbit leaves.

Eggs hatch in late summer...

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Our Favorite Beneficial Insect: Have You Heard of the Lacewing?

Jul 20, 2018
 

Friends, I garden not only for the beauty and abundance, not just for the smell of fresh lavender or the satisfaction of good, hard work.

I garden to be in awe of the world.

Today, lacewings are the embodiment of such awe for me.

What is a lacewing?

Chrysopa carnea (there's a clue!) is one of our finest beneficial insects native to the Northeast, very likely the most voracious insect in your garden. For breakfast, lunch and dinner they dine on your aphids, thrips and cabbage looper caterpillars. 

Here are four reasons you want lacewings in your garden:

1. An Unmistakable Appetite for Aphids

Adult lacewings are darling with their sweet lime green bodies, sparkling gold compound eyes and dramatic, sweeping wings like exquisite, translucent stained glass. Adult lacewings feed on nectar, pollen and the honeydew of aphids, like ants.  

Lacewing adults are gorgeous as well as nocturnal, so they're rare to see. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Their larvae,...

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