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Fruition Garden Journal

video tutorials, tried-and-true tips + our latest learnings to surround you with abundance all season long

Seeds to Sow in September

Aug 30, 2018
 

It's almost September and true confessions: I'm exhausted.

I know I'm not alone.

We've been cultivating beauty and abundance for months, with so much on our minds and hearts, amid the bustle of our everyday lives and cultural chaos. Behind each of those gorgeous photos on social media we know there is a weary gardener, often wishing someone would make her dinner from all the glorious food she's surrounded by.

Last year, Dandy saved us: Last September, while we were busy harvesting seed and picking up irrigation, she sowed seeds. Greens and herbs that fed our bodies and souls until snowfall and many that even survived the winter, re-growing the most tender and sweet leaves of the season as spring arrived. Taking that extra moment to sow a few seeds this September may be one of the best decisions you make this season. Certainly, one of the most delicious :)

Interplanting maximizes every inch of your garden space; especially when you plan to put hoops with row cover over your greens...

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Secret (& Unexpected) Signs of a Ripe Tomato

Aug 22, 2018
 

When is a tomato ripe?

Is a deceptively obvious question.

No matter our preconceived notions of color & shape, a tomato is ripe when its soft to the touch.

The best way to judge if a tomato is ripe is not by the color, but it's softness.

Touch your arm, squeeze it gently: Both firm and supple, your arm as well as your ripe tomato can be plied and is ready to bounce back instantly.

And yes, I am totally encouraging you to squeeze your tomatoes...!

Green Shoulders on Tomatoes

Do your otherwise ripe tomatoes still have green or orange shoulders? Let’s talk.

First, know this: tomatoes photosynthesize sugars from the sun not only in their green leaves, but directly in their green fruit, as well. About 80% of the flavor in a tomato comes from the energy harnessed in leaves, the balance from the fruit itself.

Second: There are different levels of photosynthetic molecules and not all are equally powerful.

Third: The most powerful ones take the longest to ‘break...

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You're Invited! Fruition's Watermelon in the Dahlias Party

Aug 17, 2018
 

Save the date!

~ join us for Fruition Seeds’ annual harvest party ~

Watermelon in the Dahlias

Saturday, August 24th

1 to 4 pm

at 7921 Hickory Bottom Road in Naples, New York

Enjoy Fruition in the glory of August with tours and tastings!

Savor a slice of our Fruition-bred watermelon, August Ambrosia...

...and pick up your organic garlic and shallots for planting this fall...

...all among thousands of dahlias :)

Bring your family, bring your friends! 

Our annual harvest party is always free, always open to the public...

...and we can't wait to see you soon!

Sow Seeds & Sing Songs, 

ps

Stay tuned for our Ginger Harvest Party this fall, date TBD!

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Identifying & Managing Tomato Disease Organically

Aug 08, 2018
 

 If you're growing tomatoes in the Northeast, you're likely growing tomato diseases, as well.

Here is how to identify the four most common tomato diseases here in the Northeast and what to do next.

Blossom-End Rot

Blossom-End Rot is an abysmal disappointment that is both manageable and preventable. Affecting paste and roma types more than other tomatoes, blossom-end rot is mostly an issue with the first set of fruit, quickly disappearing once conditions shift for the better.

Remove fruits affected by blossom-end rot as early as possible (like the fruit on the right), since the next flush will likely not be affected. 

Symptoms: black, leathery lesion at the blossom-end of the fruit, often visible when fruit is still green and quite small, becoming larger as the fruit matures.

Cause: Calcium deficiency. More accurately, it's a water deficiency. Here is how I visualize it: Calcium is a huge ion while others are small, so calcium needs more water to be absorbed...

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Garlic & Shallots for Fall Planting

Aug 02, 2018
 

Flavor keeps me coming back to the garden.

Keeps me coming back to myself. 

Garlic and shallots, with their exquisite flavor and versatility, accompany me to the kitchen in each season.

For many years, I had no idea different varieties of garlic could taste to different. Several years back, we hosted a gathering of friends, chefs and food writers, garlic lovers and garlic haters alike. We sauteed and roasted 17 varieties of garlic (it's true), each one labeled. A feast we set out, each dish without garlic: roasts and quiches, olive oil and baguette, smashed potatoes and hummus. We then added garlic to each dish, one variety after another, attempting to characterize and articulate what we were tasting.

Italy Hill Porcelain is our favorite variety for making pesto.

The unanimous conclusion: We all know the apple varieties we like best. Surely you know if you prefer an Empire over a Granny Smith, for example. But in our rush to commoditize food, we've largely forgotten the...

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Sowing Autumn Abundance in August

Jul 27, 2018
 

As I look around the farm this final week of July, I see red tomatoes on the vine, seven-foot pole beans reaching for the sky and thousands of dahlias in full bloom. Abundance and beauty abound!

Amid the extraordinary bounty of summer, I'm sowing the abundance of autumn. This week, we're prepping beds and sowing carrots, beets, watermelon radish, more cilantro, the start of cool-season lettuces and (my favorite) dwarf peas. These are the seeds that will feed us in the cool months to come. 

The right tool for every job: The tine-side of a rake picks out rocks while the flat edge levels the soil.

 

Here is the full list of seeds we're planting now, from the final week of July til the second week in August. They break down nicely into four categories:

Dwarf Peas

Fall peas are the best peas, which you know as soon as you take your first bite. As cold turns starch to sugar, fall peas are the sweetest and easily the most tender. And, because the days are getting...

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Our Favorite Beneficial Insect: Have You Heard of the Lacewing?

Jul 20, 2018
 

Friends, I garden not only for the beauty and abundance, not just for the smell of fresh lavender or the satisfaction of good, hard work.

I garden to be in awe of the world.

Today, lacewings are the embodiment of such awe for me.

What is a lacewing?

Chrysopa carnea (there's a clue!) is one of our finest beneficial insects native to the Northeast, very likely the most voracious insect in your garden. For breakfast, lunch and dinner they dine on your aphids, thrips and cabbage looper caterpillars. 

Here are four reasons you want lacewings in your garden:

1. An Unmistakable Appetite for Aphids

Adult lacewings are darling with their sweet lime green bodies, sparkling gold compound eyes and dramatic, sweeping wings like exquisite, translucent stained glass. Adult lacewings feed on nectar, pollen and the honeydew of aphids, like ants.  

Lacewing adults are gorgeous as well as nocturnal, so they're rare to see. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia.

Their larvae,...

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When to Harvest Garlic

Jul 12, 2018
 

We've cultivated garlic as a species for six thousand years...

...so when you find yourself wondering when is the perfect moment to harvest your garlic, know you are not the first person to wonder this.

In truth, the 'perfect moment' is up to a week and sometimes more, depending on the weather.

Here in the Northeast, mid-July, that 'moment' is just about...now :)

Here is the one consideration to look for, demystifying the predicament:

It's All in the Leaves

Wait for at least two or three bottom leaves to turn brown before you harvest your garlic.

Each of the leaves above ground have a corresponding 'wrapper' around each bulb, becoming papery when cured. Once one third to one half of the leaves are brown and brittle, you have strong bulb wrappers awaiting you and your garlic is truly ready to harvest.

Nutrient deficiency or nearing maturity? If your leaves are fully brown, from tip to stalk and it's July, your garlic is almost ready to harvest.

Yellowing, brown...

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Successful Succession Sowing in July

Jul 06, 2018
 

Our gardens are a lush jungle in the hot, hot sun as baby birds learn to fly across the fields and our dogs find respite under zucchini leaf umbrellas. 

As we harvest heads of lettuce, rows of beets, pull out peas and feed bolting cilantro to the chickens, we're sowing seeds so the abundance doesn't stop. Our season is short, so we've got to make the most of it! Succession sowing is the genius, seamless transition of one crop to the next, amplifying your abundance all season long.

In July, following our harvest of peas, carrots, beets, garlic and lettuce, here is what we are succession sowing, between dips in the pond:

1. Greens

You have so many options!

The good news: Greens don't require tons of fertility, so don't hesitate to plant lettuce where you just harvested lettuce.

The bad news: not all greens thrive in the heat, so be sure you're planting those that will. Nonetheless, options abound:

And here are our go-to July varieties, including our most...
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On Life, Death and Colorado Potato Beetles

Jun 27, 2018

Colorado Potato Beetles! Arrived on our farm in early June and now are in full swing. Friends, I beg you: Squish them while they’re small.

The adults, outrageously gorgeous (they’re in the scarab family, after all), consume about 10 square centimeters of potato leaf each day; their red-brown, pudgy progeny consume 40 square centimeters daily. Unchecked, Colorado Potato Beetles will defoliate your potatoes in a matter of days. 


And Friends, there is no finer way to control their populations than scouting for nickel-sized collections of bright orange eggs under leaves, their voracious larvae and escape-artist adults, squishing all you find. If you want to learn more and may enjoy seeing me cringe, here is a video tutorial about identifying them and what happens next.


We grow an acre of potatoes. We squish untold oceans of Colorado Potato Beetles. 

And Friends, it turns my stomach to turn my hands orange-brown with so much carnage. 


It turns my stomach so...

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