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Fruition Garden Journal

video tutorials, tried-and-true tips + our latest learnings to surround you with abundance all season long

Saving Tomato Seed in Seven Easy Steps

Sep 13, 2019
 

Saving tomato seed is deceptively simple, Friends.

Yes, you can simply separate each seed from the fruit, rinsing and drying them before tucking them in an envelope to sow next season. 

But here's the thing: That clear membrane surrounding each seed is full of anti-germination compounds. Unless that membrane is removed, only about 30% or so of your seeds will germinate. Which isn't the worst, but it's far from the best. 

For thousands of years our ancestors have fermented tomato seeds, effectively neutralizing those anti-germination compounds as well as removing some seed-borne diseases. It's a gloriously simple process. 

1. Harvest ripe tomatoes. 

Once tomatoes are fully ripe, the seeds inside are fully mature.

Saving fruit from your best plants is essential. The healthiest plant, the most productive, most disease-resistant, most delicious: This is the plant you want to feed --- and by fed by --- for generations to come. You're selecting seed as well as saving...

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Hope to See You This Fall!

Sep 05, 2019

We'd love to see you this fall, Friends!

And in case you didn't know, we love to host farm tours and also travel to share our passion where people are gathered, so don't be shy. Reach out to me anytime, [email protected], to explore the possibilities :)

Without further ado, here is where you'll find us this fall:

Fruition's Dahlia U-Pick & Farm Tour 

What: Pick dahlias! Hang out! Join our farm tour at 11! We'll have seed packets as well as garlic and shallot seed for sale. Dahlias are $10/bouquet. 

When: Saturday, September 7th from 10 to noon

Where: Fruition Seeds, 7921 Hickory Bottom Road in Naples, New York

National Heirloom Expo 

What: An epic celebration of seeds, food and culture! Check it out here.

When: September 10th through 12th

Petra speaks at 2 pm on the 10th and 9:30 am on the 11th

Where: Santa Rosa, California

Mother Earth News Fair 

What: The magazine comes to life! All the details :)

You'll find us all weekend in...

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5 Easy Strategies to Thwart Your Gray Squash Bugs

Aug 22, 2019
 

Many people will proclaim, "Stink Bug!" when they see Gray Squash Bugs ambling about on their zucchini. Indeed, they are 'true' bugs and the stink is real when they're crushed. Gray Squash Bugs are close relatives of the resident 'stink bugs' in your home.

A little knowledge goes a long way, so here is the biology you need to know plus the organic management keys to keep in mind.

It's a Bug's Life(cycle)

First, Gray Squash bug eggs are gorgeously shiny metallic bronze in clusters of about twenty eggs laid underneath squash leaves, often tucked along a vein. Cucumber beetle eggs are astonishingly similar, though there is more space between eggs (see below). Either way, if you see them, squish them!

An adult squash bug laying her eggs. Photo credit to insectimages.org.

Gray Squash beetle eggs are laid a dense cluster (right) compared to Cucumber beetle eggs (left) which have more space between eggs. Both are most often on the underside of cucurbit leaves.

Eggs hatch in late summer...

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The Dreaded Squash Vine Borer & How to Still Enjoy Zucchini All Season Long

Aug 22, 2019
 

First, if you want to see me shudder in disgust, don't miss minute 4:05 in the video tutorial :)

And Friends, perhaps you’ve seen these gorgeous moths frolicking in your garden, though I hope you haven't.

The Squash Vine Borer (Melitta curcurbitae) is a great moth to become familiar with because yes, they're beautiful. Also, they're one of the most devastating insects in your garden.

The gorgeous and devastating adult moth of the Squash Vine Borer.

Squash Vine Borers make their home in the base of your squash plants, devouring their soft marrow before killing their host. They're particularly fond of any Cucurbita pepo plant, which includes all manner of zucchini, summer and pattypan squash in addition to pumpkins, acorn, spaghetti, delicata squash and more. 

Thankfully they are not attracted to cucumbers and melons, but most squash, winter squash, and pumpkins can be dramatically affected. I’ve heard and seen horror...

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Fish Emulsion Demystified + Fruition's Fact Sheet for You!

Aug 15, 2019
 

Fertility is the foundation of soil health and plant health, which all very abstract, but it's as simple as this: Abundance begets abundance, so don't skimp and don't be shy!

There are many ways to increase the fertility of your gardens, Friends. 

Always, there is compost. Glorious, glorious compost. Soon I'll share more about this, one of my favorite facts of life :)

In the meantime, like two sides of a coin, our fish emulsion and granular fertilizer are easy to use and immensely effective across soil types. Of the many other approaches we use, cover cropping is a passion of ours and I look forward to sharing more with you about its art and science in the coming seasons.

Fruition's Granular Fertilizer (a brief intro)

Our granular fertilizer is Matthew's special blend of finely ground vegetables, animals and minerals, building soil as it feeds our crops with over one hundred micro- and macro-nutrients. We apply it in spring when we turn over our soil, allowing its...

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Introducing Dulcinea (or, Don't Judge a Carrot by the Cover)

Aug 07, 2019
 

Don't judge a book by its cover...

...or a carrot, either :)

Friends, Fruition has just released a new carrot variety, Dulcinea, though I must warn you: She is orange, long and tapered. At first glance, she is simply a carrot. But she's so much more. And if we've done our work well, Dulcinea will outlast us by countless generations. 

The Backdrop

Some fruits and vegetables we know by name: Granny Smith apple, Sugar Snap pea, Sungold Tomato, Cafe au Lait dahlia.

But most varieties are anonymous in our gardens and at the grocery store, the nameless commodity that fits our quintessential assumption of what is romaine lettuce, what is an onion. This is basil, this is butternut squash. There are hundreds of varieties any carrot could be, but many of us simply recognize it as a carrot. Nonetheless, every carrot has a name. 

You may not have heard of 'Bolero' carrot before, but you've most likely eaten it many times. Bolero is classic...

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3 Keys to Great Carrot Germination

Aug 07, 2019
 

Freshly dug carrots, brilliantly sweet and oh so crunchy, are among the most rewarding moments of my childhood garden.

I especially loved the carrots twisted, spiraling around one another.

Indeed, my first carrots were darling but would never have flown at a farmer's market. It's true: Straight carrots that are long strong are impressively challenging to grow, so often surrounded by weeds and accompanied by frustration.

Here are keys I've learned across the years to grow root crops --- and especially carrots and parsnips --- with confidence:

3 Keys to Increase Carrot Germination

1. Prepare Soil Well

A word to the wise: If you don't prepare your soil well, nothing else matters.

Carrots love deep, rich, well-drained soil, the looser the better. If you're not tilling, snag a fork and work the soil well at least eight inches down, incorporating organic matter like compost or our granular, slow-release organic fertilizer throughout the soil. Light, loose soil encourages...

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#wearefruition

Jul 19, 2019
 

 #wearefruition, Friends!

Because truly, we are.

We are the hope that sows, that reaps, that composts and comes alive, time after time. Deceptively small, we are the seeds. We transform the world, we begin with ourselves. Always coming to fruition, always seeding the next generation. Our work is never finished and neither is our hope: To plant a seed is to believe in tomorrow. 

We do this, together.

And Friends, so many of you have been sharing photos --- of your gardens, your families, your beauty and abundance, your questions and quandaries, of how much you've grown --- and to celebrate, we've made a home for them all:

#wearefruition

And can I tell you? 

What's in a Name

The birth of #wearefruition is so much the story of Fruition. It's the story of deep love + hard work + resisting convention + a little help from our friends.

Deep Love

We love seeds and the people who sow them past, present and future as well as the people who eat them --- and yes,...

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Fruition's Favorite Garlic Scape Recipes & Harvest Tips

Jun 20, 2019
 

Garlic scapes rise just before summer solstice here in Zone 5, the harbinger of high summer and abundance yet to come, and one of our favorite delicacies of all time.

Scapes only form on hardneck varieties. In fact, the scape is the extention of the 'hard neck' at the center of each bulb. Softneck varieties lack such a hard 'scape,' making them ideal for braiding. If you want scapes on your table, plant hardneck varieties, Friends! We grow about 8,000 heads of garlic each season, both hardneck and softneck, so we revel in the ocean of scapes we harvest each June.

Did You Know?

Garlic scapes emerge one month before bulbs mature, so once they emerge we make sure we're ready for harvest. We clean out the barn where we cure our bulbs, make sure our fans are working and get enough twine and tags so we can hang them immediately. Once one-third to one-half of a garlic's leaves are brown and drying down, it's bulb is ready to lift gently with a digging fork to eat fresh or cure for the...

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7 Steps to Transplant Tomatoes Perfectly (#2 May Surprise You)

May 23, 2019
 

Hooray!

It's finally Memorial Day!

Here in Zone 5, we're so ready to transplant tomatoes!

And Friends, transplanting is deceptively simple. Doing it well is the difference between harvesting a bit and harvesting abundance.

Here is exactly how we transplant tomatoes, after years of trial and error, and I hope these keys surround you with great abundance!

First things first:

Timing is Everything

Friends, resist planting too early.

It's counter-intuitive in our short seasons to not plant warm-season plants like tomatoes as early as possible, but here's the thing: Young, healthy transplants yield greater abundance compared to older, stressed transplants. Every time. 

Also, think of tomatoes, basil, peppers and other warm season crops as ‘cold-sensitive’ rather than ‘frost-sensitive.’

A pepper, for example, experiencing temps less than 55 F will cross her proverbial arms and pout for a few weeks (if not months) in protest of her apparent lack of...

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